Cholesterol testosterone

Testosterone is a hormone that is produced in large amounts by males (and a little bit in females), in the testes and adrenal glands. High testosterone levels are associated with sexual performance, reproductive function, muscle mass, hair growth, aggressive, competitive behaviors, and other such manly things. Testosterone levels tend to peak at the age of 40, and slowly decline from there. Luckily, there are many things you can do to increase testosterone, so if you feel like your T levels could use a boost, you've come to the right place.

The second theory is similar and is known as "evolutionary neuroandrogenic (ENA) theory of male aggression". [79] [80] Testosterone and other androgens have evolved to masculinize a brain in order to be competitive even to the point of risking harm to the person and others. By doing so, individuals with masculinized brains as a result of pre-natal and adult life testosterone and androgens enhance their resource acquiring abilities in order to survive, attract and copulate with mates as much as possible. [79] The masculinization of the brain is not just mediated by testosterone levels at the adult stage, but also testosterone exposure in the womb as a fetus. Higher pre-natal testosterone indicated by a low digit ratio as well as adult testosterone levels increased risk of fouls or aggression among male players in a soccer game. [81] Studies have also found higher pre-natal testosterone or lower digit ratio to be correlated with higher aggression in males. [82] [83] [84] [85] [86]

From a dietary perspective, plant cells do not manufacture cholesterol, and it is not found in plant foods. [30] [32] Some plant foods, such as avocado , flax seeds and peanuts , contain phytosterols , which compete with cholesterol for absorption in the intestines, reducing the absorption of both dietary and bile cholesterol. [33] However, a typical diet contributes on the order of grams of phytosterols, which is not enough to have a significant impact on blocking cholesterol absorption. Phytosterols intake can be supplemented through the use of phytosterol-containing functional foods or dietary supplements that are recognized as having potential to reduce levels of LDL -cholesterol. [34] Some supplemental guidelines have recommended doses of phytosterols in the – grams per day range (Health Canada, EFSA, ATP III, FDA). A recent meta-analysis demonstrating a 12% reduction in LDL-cholesterol at a mean dose of  grams per day. [35] However, the benefits of a diet supplemented with phytosterols have been questioned. [36]

Testosterone may also lead to an unhealthy change in your total cholesterol. Research on testosterone and cholesterol has produced mixed results, however. HDL cholesterol is considered good for you, and LDL cholesterol is considered bad for you. Some studies suggest that testosterone can lower your HDL levels, which can contribute to higher levels of LDL cholesterol. This is because the main function of HDL cholesterol is to help your body remove excess LDL particles. Other researchers argue that there’s no definitive proof that testosterone interferes with the body’s cholesterol levels.

Cholesterol testosterone

cholesterol testosterone

Testosterone may also lead to an unhealthy change in your total cholesterol. Research on testosterone and cholesterol has produced mixed results, however. HDL cholesterol is considered good for you, and LDL cholesterol is considered bad for you. Some studies suggest that testosterone can lower your HDL levels, which can contribute to higher levels of LDL cholesterol. This is because the main function of HDL cholesterol is to help your body remove excess LDL particles. Other researchers argue that there’s no definitive proof that testosterone interferes with the body’s cholesterol levels.

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