Prolixin decanoate conversion

NAMI has recently started endorsing the Partnership for Prescription Assistance , a new program that seeks to boost enrollment in existing Patient Assistance Programs by helping consumers identify and apply for programs for which they may be eligible. This may be a good place to start if you are unfamiliar with Assistance Programs that might work for you - however, we don't yet know how successful the Partnership is at enrolling people in good programs, or how much they may charge for their service. If anyone has experiences to share about the Partnership for Prescription Assistance (good or bad), please email the administration at: szwebmaster@. Visit their website ( http:// ) or call 1-888-477-2669 if you are interested.

Free information sites about PAPs - include databases searchable by state, medication, or company name

Patient education
• Inform patient that drug may cause dizziness or drowsiness. Advise patient to avoid hazardous tasks that require alertness until CNS response to drug is established.
• Tell patient to avoid ingestion of alcohol and to seek medical approval before taking other drugs.
• Instruct patient to promptly report rash or hives, anxiety, nervousness, anorexia (especially in underweight patients), suspicion of pregnancy, or intent to become pregnant.

Neuroleptic drugs elevate prolactin levels; the elevation persists during chronic administration. Tissue culture experiments indicate that approximately one-third of human breast cancers are prolactin dependent in vitro , a factor of potential importance if the prescription of these drugs is contemplated in a patient with a previously detected breast cancer . Although disturbances such as galactorrhea , amenorrhea , gynecomastia , and impotence have been reported, the clinical significance of elevated serum prolactin levels is unknown for most patients. An increase in mammary neoplasms has been found in rodents after chronic administration of neuroleptic drugs. Neither clinical studies nor epidemiologic studies conducted to date, however, have shown an association between chronic administration of these drugs and mammary tumorigenesis; the available evidence is considered too limited to be conclusive at this time.

Fluphenazine is contraindicated in patients with hematological disease. Hematologic effects including leukopenia, neutropenia, and agranulocytosis have been associated with antipsychotic use. A history of drug-induced leukopenia or neutropenia or pre-existing low white blood cell (WBC) count may increase the likelihood of developing hematologic effects during treatment with an antipsychotic medication. Patients with a history of clinically significant low WBC count or drug-induced leukopenia/neutropenia should have frequent complete blood count (CBC) assessments during the first few months of treatment. Discontinuation of the antipsychotic should be considered if a clinically significant decline in WBC occurs in the absence of an identifiable cause. Patients with clinically significant neutropenia should be closely monitored for fever and infection, and appropriate medical intervention should be instituted if necessary. Fluphenazine should be discontinued in patients with severe neutropenia (ANC < 1000/mm3); ongoing medical care is recommended until the symptoms resolve. Patients with bone marrow suppression secondary to phenothiazine use should not be re-exposed to phenothiazine treatment.

Prolixin decanoate conversion

prolixin decanoate conversion

Fluphenazine is contraindicated in patients with hematological disease. Hematologic effects including leukopenia, neutropenia, and agranulocytosis have been associated with antipsychotic use. A history of drug-induced leukopenia or neutropenia or pre-existing low white blood cell (WBC) count may increase the likelihood of developing hematologic effects during treatment with an antipsychotic medication. Patients with a history of clinically significant low WBC count or drug-induced leukopenia/neutropenia should have frequent complete blood count (CBC) assessments during the first few months of treatment. Discontinuation of the antipsychotic should be considered if a clinically significant decline in WBC occurs in the absence of an identifiable cause. Patients with clinically significant neutropenia should be closely monitored for fever and infection, and appropriate medical intervention should be instituted if necessary. Fluphenazine should be discontinued in patients with severe neutropenia (ANC < 1000/mm3); ongoing medical care is recommended until the symptoms resolve. Patients with bone marrow suppression secondary to phenothiazine use should not be re-exposed to phenothiazine treatment.

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